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Games Against Ebola

November 26th, 2014 by

brainstormingWe’re joining Humble and their Games Against Ebola jam together with a bunch of other game developers.

Please donate, every cent will go to Direct Relief in their fight against eradicating Ebola that’s currently plaguing west Africa.

We’re streaming daily, come check us out and maybe give us some ideas too!

Ittle Dew gets European release date for Wii U

October 30th, 2014 by

Skövde, 2014-10-30

Ludosity are today proud and relieved to announce that Ittle Dew finally has a release date for Wii U in Europe. The 27th of November, a Thursday is the long-awaited day, and we can’t wait to see it go live!

Ittle Dew is the titular hero, as spunky as ever as she and sidekick Tippsie tackles an island with curiously designed puzzles, innocent henchwomen and a Scottish pirate with a mysterious past..

The European release have seen a number of updates, chief of which is the ability to play Off TV with full sound coming from the Gamepad now.

ittledew_downloading

An image soon on your Wii U?

We will now start the process of sending out press copies to those that have already requested one, and we also invite reviewers to get in touch about a copy of their own, just email joel@ludosity.com! These copies can be played on an European retail unit.

Ittle Dew was initially released on Wii U in the North American region this summer, and on PC worldwide last year. It’s sold well over 100,000 copies and continues to be our strongest performer.

Ludosity is a Swedish game development studio, established in 2008 with over 20 titles released across PC, smartphones, handhelds and consoles. Currently working with Mojang on their tablet version of Scrolls, plus in-house projects.

Unity Steamworks Wrapper now free and open source

September 5th, 2014 by

Today our “Ludosity’s Steamworks Wrapper” (we were legally bound to name it so..) recieved its new price change on the Unity Asset Store: FREE! Check it out here: Unity Asset Store

We also opened up a public repository for the source code (sans proprietary code such as Steam binaries) here: GitHub repository

This means we’re releasing it into the wild for everyone to benefit from. But it also means we no longer will offer support for it – though hopefully the community support will grow into something even better. And we will of course be part of the continued development ourselves as we need new features for our own games.

The main reason we chose to do this is because the coder who was maintaining the code base no longer has the time to dedicate to both development and support any more, and has moved on to new adventures. We have had a lot of fun though, and I hope the project will only become better by this decision.

UPDATE: We have now put the MIT license on this project.

Ittle Dew 2 devblog: Slow news day

August 29th, 2014 by

Hello there, scores of rabid Ittle fans swarming our offices and staring through the windows. Daniel here to say something vague about Ittle Dew 2 again!

 

What’s going on?

At the moment, only me (designer) and Anton (artist) are working on the game at all, mostly planning and making the graphical content. Stefan (programmer) becomes available for some small coding work now and then, but most of the time we have to make do with the functionality we have. Therefore, progress is pretty slow.

 

 

What’s done so far?

The game’s design has been mostly laid out down to the finer details, but a lot might change as development progresses. As far as actual development goes – as opposed to me just drawing dungeons and puzzles – we have a player running around various work-in-progress areas and smacking enemies, an enemy scripting system and level editor by Stefan, and some neat room transitions.

 

What’s the plan?
As the rest of the team are tied up with other projects for a few months more, the game will continue stumbling along, maybe picking up a few lines of code here and there. We don’t even have a deadline on deciding a deadline yet, but hey – here’s a Fishbun with legs.

Ittle Dew and speedrunning

July 15th, 2014 by

‘Sup!

We’ve recently seen that people are speedrunning Ittle Dew more and more – which is amazing! There is now an official un-official leaderboard in the form of a Google Doc, maintained by the top runners. You can find it here: Ittle Dew Leaderboards

One of the reasons they keep this document instead of just using the Steam Leaderboards is because up until today, those leaderboards have been filled with false entries. Some are obvious hacks, while others might be the result from a glitch in the game. Either way it made serious running more difficult on those boards.

Now the boards have been weeded out though. There were some entries that were close enough to be almost believable, but in the end we decided to cut anything below the official WR (currently 636 seconds) and if we did delete a true time, then all we need is some video proof and we’ll put your time up again =)

Going forward we intend on making some updates for runners – we’re gonna look into fixing some of the bugs that make it harder to run, and also to add a no-dialogue option! Opinions are divided on that one it seems, but should at least make practice easier.

On a personal note, I’ll also try and stream some running soon – gonna try at my PB and break 12 minutes =)

 

Space Hunk download

July 11th, 2014 by

Way back when, we made a Mojam game called Space Hunk.

Seems we forgot to actually put it up for download! So here you go: www.ludosity.com/downloads/spacehunk_all.zip !

Read about the jam here: http://ludosity.com/2013/02/final-build-of-space-hunk/

Ittle Dew: European Wii U release, NA patch, Japan

July 3rd, 2014 by

Ittle Dew is now completed for the European Wii U eShop! The biggest update is localization, but we have also addressed the two biggest complaints from the NA release: stuttering during saving, and that no sound is coming from the GamePad. We have also made a number of smaller bugfixes and polish overall.

Ittle Dew Wii U EU changelog:

  • Localization for English, Spanish, French, German & Italian
  • Threaded saving – no more stuttering!
  • Audio on the GamePad
  • Bugfixes

We’re currently waiting for age ratings and final approval, and expect to have Ittle Dew in the EU eShop by August – stay tuned for release date. Sadly it doesn’t look like there will be a German release though – the USK rating is quite expensive and it might not even make its money back in Germany.

We also intend to patch the NA version with these changes. Apart from being improved over-all, a Spanish localization also means we can publish it in Mexico! Lastly, we’re also in talks with a publisher in Japan about a Wii U release there – stay tuned for more info!

Ittle Dew 2 devblog: Design

June 7th, 2014 by

Hello, diehard Ludosity fans who spend most of your time walking about our offices asking for autographs. In this post I’ll explain the game’s direction and overall design. If you’ve played the original Ittle Dew, you may or may not be glad to hear that things will be a bit different this time around.

 

Ittle Dew 1: so many puzzles

id2_blog1

The original game was centered on The Castle, and the three items you could purchase from Itan Carver in any order. To beat the game, you needed two of the three items, but most players obtained all three before facing the final boss. The overworld was more of an afterthought – to be honest, the entire game besides The Castle was an afterthought, being designed during the game’s production.

The focus on puzzles meant that designing the dungeons, in particular The Castle, took a really long time. Players could also get stuck on puzzles that were required for progress, and it wasn’t always obvious whether you could solve a particular puzzle with your current items or not – some players thought that getting the items in certain orders was impossible, since the shortcuts could be rather sneaky.

The combat was also not the focus of the game, with simple enemies and virtually no penalty for death.

 

Ittle Dew 2: opening it upid2_blog2

Ittle 2 takes place on an overworld divided into eight progressively harder areas, each of which holds a dungeon. The dungeons can be tackled in whatever order you find them, except for the final one. In case the player doesn’t want to explore the world themselves, completing a dungeon will reveal the location of the next recommended one on the overworld map.

The warp garden is a place located in the center of the overworld. Finding a warp on the overworld will link it to the warp garden, so backtracking is never much of an issue. Warps are located near dungeons and other important places.

There are four “active items”, mapped to four different buttons, so there’s no need to switch out your gear. The remaining equipment is passive, and can be inspected on the pause screen. Finding another copy of an item you already have will instead upgrade it, making it more powerful or granting it new abilities. Everything Ittle finds is immediately useful for either combat, exploration, or both. Additional copies of the items you’ll find in the dungeons can be also found in secret locations on the overworld, and some shortcuts in the dungeons require items from later dungeons.

Speaking of, Ittle 2 has a bigger focus on exploration and combat. The puzzles are still a big part of the game, and will still get pretty tough, but they won’t be in each and every room anymore.

id2_blog3

 

Making the player feel fairly treatedid2_blog5

Every secret on the overworld can be found using only the starting Stick, so you won’t be wandering past obvious metaphorical keyholes, having to remember their locations while looking for the metaphorical key. That’s not to say that finding the secrets will be easy – discovering how the world works is part of the game.

If the enemies beat you up, you’ll keep all your progress but wake up at the entrance to the current dungeon, or the latest warp you went through. You’ll be opening up shortcuts and mini-warps in the process though, and dungeons are designed to avoid dead-ends. Once you enter a dungeon, you can solve it with everything you already have or what is found inside.

There’s also a pause menu option to instantly return you to the start of the dungeon (or the latest warp) while refilling your health, since it’s essentially the same thing as intentionally walking into enemies to run out of health and respawn there. Beside each warp and dungeon entrance is also a gadget that refills your health to maximum, for the same reason.

While there are some humorous cutscenes, mostly involving the bosses, there are no “mini-cutscenes” interrupting the regular gameplay. If you find a chest, you simple whack it into debris in one swing and collect the contents while a small explanatory popup appears. Control is never taken from the player during this time, nor while solving puzzles or opening doors. You can also skip cutscenes or turn them off completely.

The most interesting details about how the game world works are written on secret signs in the dungeons. The signs are not that well hidden, but if you discover something like this by yourself, rather than being told about it in some sort of tutorial, you’ll be more likely to read and remember it.

id2_blog4

 

You should have some sort of conclusion or closing comment here.
You’re probably right.

Ittle Dew 2 devblog: 2D to 3D

May 31st, 2014 by

Hello, Ittle Dew main artist here. Let’s talk about the move to 3D for a bit.

There’s a lot of great celshaded games recently (Guilty Gear Xrd, Jojo All Star Battle to name a few) that look amazing.
Celshading has always intrigued me – one of my favorite games of all time is Jet Set Radio, one of the first celshaded games i believe, a game that still looks so good. So when we discusssed Ittle Dew 2 being made in 3D, I saw this as a really fun challenge. Ittle Dew had a very particular style, with heavy black outlines and a wobbly style of animation (that wobbly style was actually selected because it makes animating so much easier! hah). We had previously experimented with Ittles style in 3D, with a dungeon crawler idea, and it had looked pretty good. However, in that test I used a lot of “billboards”(flat “sprite” objects that always look at the camera, think of the barrels in DOOM or items in Minecraft), while Ittle 2 went on to be a lot more “real” 3D.

Picture of said dungeon crawler:
gfx_dungeoncrawler

(The Card City Nights faces are just placeholder, since it’s just a little prototype)
The first thing we did was have one of our wizard programmers make something do we could have wobbly outlines even in 3D, since by now we felt that was a big part of the Ittle Dew style. But just like in Ittle Dew it will only be used on things that are alive or interactive, kinda. To make them stand out. Using it on everything all the time would probably be really annoying to look at.
Here’s the process of a recently created enemy, Safety Jenny, with wobbly outlines:

(Animation is work in progress)

gfx_safetyjenny
animated

The outlines on both characters and props are not automatically created by an outline shader or such.
I find that to get decent looking outlines you need to create them manually so you can tweak problematic areas by hand.

There’s not much more to say about the surroundings, but let’s look at a picture.
The most important thing is to not lose too much of Ittle Dew’s charm when moving to 3D, and I dare say it’s going fairly well.

Having a (mostly) fixed camera helps a lot here!

gfx_comparison2

And that’s pretty much it for me. Not a lot of informative text, but a bunch of pictures at least!

Ittle Dew 2 devblog: Shaders for beginners

May 17th, 2014 by

Hello everyone! Today we will learn how to make lava, and also how to make water.
“But this is blasphemy!” you say. “Only gods may do such things.” While that is a fact, sometimes you have to take the good with the evil.

Lava

We start off examining the basic ingredients of molten lava: A greyscale noise and a gradient map. Something like this perhaps:

LavaColor1LavaNoise2

Now if we just applied that map to the noise we would get a nice boring static lava-like thing, which wouldn’t do at all. It needs to move. Also I don’t know if you’ve ever seen lava, but it’s thick like the slime of a slug and moves faster in the center of a stream than it does close to the edges. We can solve this problem by having the above noise move in a certain direction with a certain speed, and having a different noise texture move in the same direction with a different speed (and don’t cheat by using the same noise texture; you’ll get artifacts and then cry when they happen to overlap). We then blend these two textures based on how close to the center they are (preferably using another texture to determine blend the factor). Now we have a noise that moves at different rates, and this is what we want to apply the gradient map to. With a really simple blend texture, it will look a little something like this:

lavashader

 

Water

Making water is a bit more complicated deal, but it starts with two parts. A big old plane mesh with lots of subdivisions, for waves; and everything else that’s going to be affected by these waves. The waves are fairly straightforward; just move them up and down in a vertex program based on some sine function. However you will want to make sure whatever position-based arguments to pass are based on the world-position of the vertices, because we will have to recreate this function in the wave-affected objects later. For convenience, let’s say our wave function is
sin(P.x + t*2π)
where P is our vertex’ world position and t is the time offset of the waves. We apply this function to the vertices of the plane mesh and we obviously get waves moving in the x-direction only. That’s fine for now, but the advanced reader would want to do something about that.

Anyway, now that we have waves, we switch to the other objects. We want to create foam or something at the intersection with the wave mesh. To do this, we first use the same function to calculate the current wave height in their vertex programs, then use this to create a gradient from 1 at the wave height, to 0 at a certain height above the wave height. For extra fancy, apply a noise to this gradient, using the gradient value as a threshold. Maybe move the noise around for a more dynamic look.

Sadly we are not finished yet. It may look okay at this point, but we also want whatever it is to look a bit wet after the waves have rolled by, and also for this wetness to slowly creep down towards the water. We can’t simply use the wave function for this because that will make the wetness move in a sine wave, which looks terrible. We need a function that moves up with the wave function, but goes down linearly, until it goes up with the next wave, and so on. How to do that? Well it’s pretty simple, just make a sawtooth function with the same period as the wave function, offset it in height and phase so the top coincides with the top of the wave function and tweak the slope to your liking. Using the above wave function, our “wetness” function could look something like this:
1 – frac((P.x + t) – 0.25) * x
where x is the slope multiplier value.

Then just take the maximum of these two functions to get the current height of the wetness. Use the resulting value to shade the fragments below darker.

Go all that? You should now be able to make something like this:water

The Earth is counting on you!! Good luck!